Tag Archives: carnaval

Carnival o Carnaval 2016 in Panama

Celebrating Carnaval in Panama

However you spell it, Carnival or Carnaval, it is not just a Brazilian holiday or only celebrated in Rio de Janeiro. Carnaval is a mega-holiday celebrated throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, and it’s even celebrated in Europe. No matter where you go or which country you find it in, Carnaval is a joyous, festive event.
Golden carvings of women on a floats for Panama Carnival with Panama City skyline in the background

As elsewhere, in Panama, Carnaval always takes place over the four to five days leading up to Ash Wednesday. Even though it’s not an official holiday for the country, many businesses in Panama shut down for the entire time, and the the entire country lets loose to party hearty. People all over Panama gather to drink, eat, and party until the sun comes up for 4 days.

Float 1

The word chaos comes to mind. The only thing in America that’s even slightly similar is in New Orleans, where it’s called Mardi Gras.
The first Carnaval in Panama took place in colonial times, when individuals dressed as king and queen of Spain, conquering soldiers, slaves and Indians and then proceeded along a road while simulating battles. When it was revived in the early 1900s, they chose a king and queen, complete with attendants, held a parade, and had fireworks. Or so I’ve read. That doesn’t explain why it’s done that way everywhere in Latin America … does it?

Where to party for Carnaval in Panama

Some of the biggest parties are in the interior (center of the country). Everyone seems to agree that the town of Las Tablas is the country’s top Carnaval destination, which sounds exciting … but if you try to get more details about going it might be followed up by phrases like “but it’s so big,” “it’s only for Panamanians who are used to that sort of thing,” or “but you need to be careful.” Between the crowds, potential pickpockets, heavy drinking, 4- to 5-hour drive and needing hotel reservations months ahead of time, any gringo might consider not going.

Float

Public safety is a major concern. Police will be out in full force.

Highlights of Panama Carnaval and what to expect

Every year in Panama City the police set up traffic blockades along Avenida Balboa, the large, 4-lane road that runs along the waterfront, and set up a tall perimeter fence around the festival area. As with most places these days, there are security lines with pat down (male and female) to ensure no one is carrying weapons.
Tip: Get there early; the lines get really long by late afternoon.

The streets will start filling up with people early in the day.
Mid-afternoon might be when the schedule says it will start, but thats probably when it will be getting started. That’s typical of Panama.

Water 1

Tip: Wear comfortable walking shoes that will protect your toes; some people don’t pay attention to where they step.
Inside the fence we found amusement park-style rides, food booths, drink booths, live music, games, vendors selling souvenirs and culecos, water-filled trucks which shoot streams of water out at the dancing and sweating hordes of people. Don’t think that avoiding the trucks will keep you nice and dry, though; we saw a number of people carrying loaded water guns. Also, be prepared to get wet a number of people will have loaded water guns and they aren’t afraid to use them!

Water Trucks

Tip: If you are there on Carnival’s final night, you will be treated to a very nice fireworks display after dark. To avoid the press of people at the end, leave early and find a bar, hotel or restaurant that offers a nice view of the water. You’ll be able to sit and enjoy the fireworks in relative peace and quiet. Check the schedule first to ensure you’re not missing anything else, though!

What You Will See 

Carnaval Parade Floats
The full-blown parade begins after sunset, but they don’t wait until then to parade around. So that everyone gets a chance to see the floats, they drive around the grounds while it’s still daylight as well.

Float 3

People dress up for Carnaval
Some people who attend Carnaval like to dress up in colorful and creative costumes.
Woman at Panama Carnival wearing a tree costume
Others prefer the costumes of the very traditional diablos. These devil costumes vary by region. While they may have carried—and used—real whips in Bocas del Toro, in at Panama City’s Carnaval, the whips they carry are mostly just used as props.

Women 2

And then there’s the food …
Besides the soda, water, local rum and cerveza, there’s a huge variety of really delicious food. You can eat and drink to your heart’s delight. Grilled chicken, chorizo (sausage), hamburgers, hot dogs, plantains, you-name-it.
Tip: Find out where the toilets are as soon as you arrive; you’ll need them!

Woman 1

 

Woman

 

 

Carnaval or Carnival 2016 In Panama

Celebrating Carnaval in Panama

However you spell it, Carnival or Carnaval, it is not just a Brazilian holiday or only celebrated in Rio de Janeiro. Carnaval is a mega-holiday celebrated throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, and it’s even celebrated in Europe. No matter where you go or which country you find it in, Carnaval is a joyous, festive event.
Golden carvings of women on a floats for Panama Carnival with Panama City skyline in the background

As elsewhere, in Panama, Carnaval always takes place over the four to five days leading up to Ash Wednesday. Even though it’s not an official holiday for the country, many businesses in Panama shut down for the entire time, and the the entire country lets loose to party hearty. People all over Panama gather to drink, eat, and party until the sun comes up for 4 days.

Float 1

The word chaos comes to mind. The only thing in America that’s even slightly similar is in New Orleans, where it’s called Mardi Gras.
The first Carnaval in Panama took place in colonial times, when individuals dressed as king and queen of Spain, conquering soldiers, slaves and Indians and then proceeded along a road while simulating battles. When it was revived in the early 1900s, they chose a king and queen, complete with attendants, held a parade, and had fireworks. Or so I’ve read. That doesn’t explain why it’s done that way everywhere in Latin America … does it?

Where to party for Carnaval in Panama

Some of the biggest parties are in the interior (center of the country). Everyone seems to agree that the town of Las Tablas is the country’s top Carnaval destination, which sounds exciting … but if you try to get more details about going it might be followed up by phrases like “but it’s so big,” “it’s only for Panamanians who are used to that sort of thing,” or “but you need to be careful.” Between the crowds, potential pickpockets, heavy drinking, 4- to 5-hour drive and needing hotel reservations months ahead of time, any gringo might consider not going.

Float

Public safety is a major concern. Police will be out in full force.

Highlights of Panama Carnaval and what to expect

Every year in Panama City the police set up traffic blockades along Avenida Balboa, the large, 4-lane road that runs along the waterfront, and set up a tall perimeter fence around the festival area. As with most places these days, there are security lines with pat down (male and female) to ensure no one is carrying weapons.
Tip: Get there early; the lines get really long by late afternoon.

The streets will start filling up with people early in the day.
Mid-afternoon might be when the schedule says it will start, but thats probably when it will be getting started. That’s typical of Panama.

Water 1

Tip: Wear comfortable walking shoes that will protect your toes; some people don’t pay attention to where they step.
Inside the fence we found amusement park-style rides, food booths, drink booths, live music, games, vendors selling souvenirs and culecos, water-filled trucks which shoot streams of water out at the dancing and sweating hordes of people. Don’t think that avoiding the trucks will keep you nice and dry, though; we saw a number of people carrying loaded water guns. Also, be prepared to get wet a number of people will have loaded water guns and they aren’t afraid to use them!

Water Trucks

Tip: If you are there on Carnival’s final night, you will be treated to a very nice fireworks display after dark. To avoid the press of people at the end, leave early and find a bar, hotel or restaurant that offers a nice view of the water. You’ll be able to sit and enjoy the fireworks in relative peace and quiet. Check the schedule first to ensure you’re not missing anything else, though!

What You Will See 

Carnaval Parade Floats
The full-blown parade begins after sunset, but they don’t wait until then to parade around. So that everyone gets a chance to see the floats, they drive around the grounds while it’s still daylight as well.

Float 3

People dress up for Carnaval
Some people who attend Carnaval like to dress up in colorful and creative costumes.
Others prefer the costumes of the very traditional diablos. These devil costumes vary by region. While they may have carried—and used—real whips in Bocas del Toro, in at Panama City’s Carnaval, the whips they carry are mostly just used as props.

Women 2

And then there’s the food …
Besides the soda, water, local rum and cerveza, there’s a huge variety of really delicious food. You can eat and drink to your heart’s delight. Grilled chicken, chorizo (sausage), hamburgers, hot dogs, plantains, you-name-it.
Tip: Find out where the toilets are as soon as you arrive; you’ll need them!

Woman 1

Woman